środa, 22 czerwca 2011

Gecko - Madagascar Day Gecko

Madagascar day gecko (Phelsuma madagascariensis madagascariensis) is a diurnal subspecies of geckos. It lives on the eastern coast of Madagascar and typically inhabits rainforests and dwells on trees. The Madagascar day gecko feeds on insects and nectar.

This lizard is one of the largest living day geckos. It can reach a total length of about 22 cm (8.7 in). The body color is light green or bluish green. The skin between the scales often has a light color. A rust-coloured stripe extends from the nostril to behind the eye. On the back there are brownish or red-brick coloured dots which may form a thin line along the mid back. These geckos do not have eyelids, and they have flattened toe pads.

This species inhabits the whole east coast of Madagascar. It can also be found on the islets Nosy Bohara, Ste. Marie and throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Also, the gecko was deliberately introduced to a restaurant in the Florida Keys, US, by reptile experts. This was due to the garden surrounding the restaurant and the great possibilities it provided for reproduction. The experts come back every year and remove all excess geckos to sell in pet shops.

sobota, 11 czerwca 2011

Spiders - Brachypelma albopilosum

Sorry that you have to wait so long for new post.
In last week I had 5 exams, and no time for myself. Next week it's going to be only 3, and I will post more and more :)

Brachypelma albopilosum (The Honduras Curlyhair Tarantula) is a species of tarantula known commonly as the Honduran curlyhair or simply curlyhair. Its native range includes Central America, from Honduras to Costa Rica . They are terrestrial, opportunistic burrowing spiders. This tarantula is covered in long hairs that have a characteristic curl to them giving them a unique look.

The Curlyhair Tarantula is an ideal tarantula species for a beginner because of it's docile temperament and relatively large size. Although fairly common and easy on the pocket, this species is more than just a brown tarantula. Up close, Curlyhair Tarantulas have gold and tan hairs covering their bodies. The legs are a darker brown, in contrast to the practically bronze carapace. This comes out to be one fine-looking spider without being exceedingly colorful. Also, true to their common name, most Curlyhair Tarantulas have hair that looks curly (actually more wavy than curvy, but we'll let that slide). They are very hardy tarantulas that make lasting pets. They also make great "show" spiders since they can be taken out and handled, although handling should not take place frequently because there's always the possibility of the tarantula falling off your hand and splitting it's abdomen open (likely fatal). Curlyhair Tarantulas seem to have more personality (tarantulality) than the conventional starter species, the Chilean Rose Tarantula. Overall, Curlyhair Tarantulas are great for anybody, and yours may easily become a favorite in your collection!

piątek, 3 czerwca 2011

Reptiles - Leopard Gecko

The leopard is a nocturnal ground-dwelling gecko naturally found in the deserts of southern Central Asia, and throughout Pakistan, to the northwestern parts of India. Unlike most geckos, leopard geckos possess movable eyelids. It has become a well-established and popular pet in captivity.

Leopard geckos were first described as a species by zoologist Edward Blyth in 1854 as Eublepharis macularis. The generic name Eublepharis is a combination of the Greek words Eu (true), and blephar (eyelid), as having eyelids is what distinguishes members of this subfamily from other geckos. The specific name, macularius, derives from the Latin word macula meaning "spot" or "blemish", referring to the animal's natural spotted markings.

Leopard geckos are related to many different geckos including the African fat-tailed gecko. There are five subspecies, including the nominative species: Eublepharis macularius macularius, E. m. fasciolatus (Günther 1864), E. m. montanus (Börner 1976), and E. m. smithi (Börner 1981).

The native habitat of the leopard gecko is the rocky, dry grassland and desert regions of south-Asian Afghanistan, Pakistan, north-west India, and parts of Iran. Winter temperatures in these areas can be quite low, below 10 °C (50 °F), forcing the animals underground into semi-hibernation, called brumation, living on fat reserves. As nocturnal creatures, they spend the day hidden under rocks or in burrows to escape the daytime heat and emerge at dusk to feed by hunting insects. These Geckos are solitary, and do not usually live with other animals.

Leopard geckos are typically small in size. Hatchlings tend to be 6.5 to 8.4 cm (2.6 to 3.3 inches) in length and weighing about 3 grams while the adult geckos are about 20.5 to 27.5 cm (8.1 to 10.9 inches) in length and weigh about 45 to 65 grams.

Those found in the wild typically have a darker, dull, and drab coloration than those kept in captivity as pets. Those in captivity generally have an assortment of skin colors and patterns. The skin of a leopard gecko is very durable, which provides protection from the rough sand and rocky terrain of their dry environment. Their dorsal side is covered with small bumps, which gives a rough texture and appearance while their ventral side is thin, transparent, and smooth. Like all reptiles, leopard geckos shed their skin. In the few days before the shedding, the skin will turn color to a translucent whitish gray. Adults shed an average of once a month, while juveniles will sometimes shed twice as much. The gecko will eat its old skin after shedding, revealing a brighter colored one. Eating the shed skin is a means for obtaining protein and vitamins for growth.